More troops for the King…

Well, finally saw Terry last night and picked up some figures and more Purbeck Terrain – some I think is Gary’s so if you’re reading this, I have it on loan now :-).

Figures consist of…

Hessians – von Bose. Old Glory figures.

British Legion Cavalry. Polly Oliver figures.
Still lots more to paint for Cowpens!

And finally, straying way south, some native support!

Terry’s painting is really nice and the photos don’t do them justice. There’s a command stand for the Hessian 90% complete which may be my first task. The remaining British Legion cavalry will probably be Old Glory as I have few if any of the Polly Oliver figures left.

There was also a nice selection of the 9″ Purbeck blocks with roads and rivers and some more hills and trees. I can put together a fair size battlefield now – if only I had a table to put it on!

Also gotback my copy of Ewald’s Hessian Journal which has cropped up many times in the account if the Philadelphia campaign I’m currently reading.

Took delivery of the Encyclopedia of Uniforms of the American Revolution. Only had a quick glance but the images seem to be of variable quality. Some very nice, some less so. Text seems very pro -American to me too :-). Some useful info there though so will investigate more later.

Back again soon…probably after Derby.

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More on the rules. The quick reference sheet is available for download but I’ll gradually reproduce and comment on them in posts here.

Training

1stClass Grenadiers, Light Infantry, Guards
2ndClass Regulars, Hessians, Continentals, Rangers, Jagers, British Legion foot, Queen’s Rangers
3rdClass Raw Regulars, Veteran Militia, Loyalists, Mountain Men
4thClass Militia, Inexperienced Loyalists, European-led Indians
5thClass Other Indians

We used the above classifications for troops. We felt that the best of the loyalist troops were as good as regulars. I have some references to support this somewhere.

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More books added to collection…

Just took delivery of:

McGuire, Thomas J. (2007). The Philadelphia Campaign: Vol. 1. Brandywine and the Fall of Philadelphia. Stackpole Books.

McGuire, Thomas J. (2007). The Philadelphia Campaign: Vol. 2. Germantown and the Roads to Valley Forge. Stackpole Books.

Wilson, David K. (2008).The Southern Strategy: Britain’s Conquest of South Carolina and Georgia, 1775-1780. University of South Carolina Press

and will be getting my copy of:

Ewald, Johann von. (1971).Diary of the American War: A Hessian Journal. New Haven Yale University Press.

back soon.

Also looking at picking up the Encyclopedia of Uniforms of the American Revolution as well soon. I’ve heard different opinions of it but it looks worth a look. And also the Troiani book on the American Revolution as well.

Volume 1 of McGuire will be my reading matter on our little holiday coming up later this week. If I get chance to read!

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Basing

There are many basing conventions based on rules used and personal preference. Do the rules work with elements or with individual figures as well? Standard frontages? Is the size of the frontages important and dependent on figure ratio and ground scale used? I remember reading Bruce Quarrie’s guide to Napoleonic wargaming and the calculations used there. Long time ago… 🙂

We chose

1 fig. = 7.5 men 1 inch = 25 yards 1 turn = approx. 5 mins 1 gun = 2 pieces
Close/Loose Order 4 figs in 2 ranks 20 x 25mm 30 men
Lights 2 figs in 1 rank 20 x 12.5mm 15 men
Cavalry/Command 2 figs in 1 rank 25 x 30mm 15 men
Militia 4 figs in 2 ranks 25 x 30mm 30 men
Irregular skirmish 2 figs in 1 rank 25 x 15mm 15 men
 
Infantry in units of 3 -12 stands or as historical units 1 stand must be identified as the command group
Cavalry in units of 2-6 stands or as historical units
Skirmishers in units of min 4 stands = 2 FULL STANDS
Artillery 3lb/4lb 30 x 40mm 3 figs + limber (30 x 40mm)
  6pdr 30 x 40mm 4 figs + limber (30 x 70mm)
  6pdr + 40 x 40mm 5 figs + limber (40 x 70mm)

We arrived at the figure ratio by looking at the size of units at Cowpens, deciding what gave a good ‘look’ for that unit, allowing also the representation of smaller units, deciding we wanted a double rank look and then working it out from there. This gave us a reasonable look and feel for Cowpens and a good number of figures to paint. We decided that regular infantry (British Line, Continentals and Hessians) would be in close order, deciding that if we really wanted to represent a ‘loose’ order we would just move bases slightly apart. Light infantry were done in twos on half depth bases to allow them to re-join the line if need be. In retrospect, having seen other peoples figures, I think I’d dp the Lights with 2 figures on a full size base now. Seeing as I only have a few I may well re–base them.

Militia were done in a slightly looser formation. I’m not now sure if this really works for the regulars but I really cannot face re-basing! Besides, if we moved on to Yorktown we’d probably want some Hessians and the French in Close Order anyway. Maybe the tightness of the ranks also represents cohesion and training as well?

My slight concern is over the frontages for cavalry at this scale as at Cowpens I’m looking at 20 stands to represent the British Legion cavalry (300).

Going our/my own route also makes it harder to play with other people/rules as basing may be different as well as figure ratio. The local group, Tyneside Wargames, are also venturing into 15mm AWI but focusing on the larger, earlier Northern battles. They are using the 4 figure ‘standard’ 40mm frontage but with a ‘unit’ still in two ranks. This would at least make my troops usable baring a slightly wider Militia front.

I’d thought of doing the British Legion Infantry in the looser basing but remember reading somewhere that the Infantry were pretty well drilled. I’ve also decided I may do a few Light Infantry stands for them as well. Good news tonight is that Terry (who did some of the other painting) is happy to part with his figures as he is not pursuing the period. So hopefully I’ll soon have some Hessians, British Legion cavalry and a few Native Americans. Oh, and some more Purbeck terrain!

Well, that’ll do for tonight. Tired…

More soon…

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The British are coming!

Seems I have far fewer British troops than I thought. The other two guys had done the Royal Welch, some Hessians, Indians and Tarleton’s Dragoons which made up a respectable force for the few games we had.

My contribution was:

British Legion Infantry
British Light Infantry
Jaegers
contingent of 71st Highlanders
Tarleton himself and a British Major for him to upstage!

When I can afford some lights I’ll try for some better detail shots but to introduce them here comes the British flank attack!

The Maryland Continentals are forced to face their flank as Light Infantry descend from the woods and the British Legion supported by the 71st Highlanders launch their attack, Hessian Jaegers pushing back the riflemen and harassing the Continentals. Tarleton himself urges them on.

The Light Infantry emerge from the woods in support of the main attack.

The British Legion infantry, shielded by Jaegers, begin their assault.

I’d like to get some detail shots and closeups of the troops but may need to borrow a better camera for that. I now need to decide what to paint next…

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